Now the left is turning to RBG Radicals point blaming the late Supreme Court Justice for DYING in 2020

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Now they turn on RBG! The left accuses the late Supreme Court justice of dying before retiring in 2020, which paved the way for Amy Coney Barrett

  • Some liberal journalists have blamed the failure of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as partly responsible for the overturning of Roe v. Wade
  • The writers took to Twitter to throw shade at LBG, who is normally seen as a liberal icon, questioning why she didn’t step down while President Obama was in office.
  • Some have suggested that if RBG had been replaced by a liberal justice instead of conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett, the ruling might not have happened.
  • Progressives blame her for not resigning in time and allowing a leftist court judge to replace her

Liberal Twitter users took to the platform to lambaste the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg following the court’s decision to overturn Roe v Wade on Friday.

While a number of journalists blame former President Trump for appointing three conservative justices during his time in the White House, things took a surprising turn when attention turned to RBG.

Several users saw fit to blame the late Supreme Court justice for the court’s landmark abortion ruling, with some suggesting that had she decided to step down earlier while President Obama was in office, she would have been replaced at his turn by a liberal justice.

When Ginsburg died in September 2020 at the age of 87, her vacancy allowed Trump to nominate conservative Judge Amy Coney Barrett to replace her.

Some liberal journalists have blamed the failure of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as partly responsible for the overturning of Roe v. Wade

The writers took to Twitter to throw shade at LBG, who is normally seen as a liberal icon, questioning why she didn't step down while President Obama was in office.

The writers took to Twitter to throw shade at LBG, who is normally seen as a liberal icon, questioning why she didn’t step down while President Obama was in office.

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served on the court from 1993 until her death in 2020

Amy Coney Barrett

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg served on the court from 1993 until her death in 2020, after which she was replaced by conservative Justice Amy Coney Barrett.

Hollywood Reporter columnist Scott Feinberg described Ginsburg as a “hero” whose decision not to retire “contributed to the destruction” of Roe v. Wade.

“RBG was a hero for many reasons. But the terrible irony is that his decision to stay too long at the party contributed to the destruction of one of the things he held most dear. Unfortunately, it will be a big part of his legacy,’ he tweeted.

Podcaster and comedian Katie Halper saw fit to poke fun at RBG with a sarcastic tweet.

“I’m so glad RBG continued doing planks instead of stepping down from the Supreme Court,” she wrote along with a photo of Justice Ginsburg doing planks.

Rebecca Fishbein, who writes for Vice as a freelancer, then suggested that Ginsburg and former President Obama were responsible for the court’s decision.

“Well, maybe someone could have convinced rbg to retire,” she wrote in response to a statement from Obama criticizing the court’s decision.

A number of writers have seemed to link RBG's refusal to resign from the Supreme Court with the overturning of Roe v.  wade friday

A number of writers have seemed to link RBG’s refusal to resign from the Supreme Court with the overturning of Roe v. wade friday

A conservative writer applauded RBG's decision not to retire while Obama was in office

A conservative writer applauded RBG’s decision not to retire while Obama was in office

“But at least RBG must die in office,” wrote freelance journalist Skylar Baker-Jordan.

It was a sentiment shared by journalist Eoin Higgins. “Special thanks to RBG today for making this possible,” he wrote.

“Thank you also to Obama for not nominating Garland or anyone else to replace Scalia, your inaction and failed presidency helped make this moment a reality,” he continued.

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court after its decision on Friday morning

Protesters gather outside the Supreme Court after its decision on Friday morning

Calls for Ginsburg to retire and install a safe replacement on the pitch came ahead of the 2012 election.

Ginsburg, by this point, had endured bouts of colon and pancreatic cancer.

Calls for his retirement were met with Ginsburg’s stubborn refusal to heed those calls.

“It’s so multi-layered because she cared so passionately about advancing equality for all. She found a way to bring women into the constitution. And yet what she helped give us is a court that for a long, long time is going to overturn the equality rulings that she was a part of,’ Dorothy Samuels, who sat on the board, told Politico. editorial board of the New York Times. . “It was an extraordinarily self-centered thing to do.”

“She played,” said Stanford law professor Michele Dauber.

“She didn’t just play with herself. She played with the rights of my daughter and my granddaughter. And sadly, that’s his legacy. I think it’s tragic.

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